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Items tagged "football":

  1.   reblogged from: beneaththepool

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  2.   reblogged from: football-is-a-dream

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  3.   reblogged from: killerqueeen

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  4. blaurenlew:

#soccer #Africa #nationalgeographic
      reblogged from: blaurenlew

    blaurenlew:

    #soccer #Africa #nationalgeographic

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  5. Sports Fields

      reblogged from: groupstage

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  6.   reblogged from: groupstage

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  7. #AFCON can’t recall if i posted this last year when i found it? 

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  8. footybedsheets:

globalvoices:


IMAGE: Ethiopian Muslims protest the Ethiopian Government while supporting the Ethiopian Team in South Africa at The Cup of African Nations 2013. From the Awolia School Support Page Facebook Page
Ethiopians across the world are celebrating TeamEthiopia, their national Soccer team, who fought a hard draw against defending champions Zambia in the 2013 Africa Cup of Nations in Nelspruit, South Africa.


Sport brings people together. The cheerful Oromo crowd in South Africa today is a good example of that. In the states, rarely do we see both sides (Oromo and other Ethiopians) cheering for the same team. We have separate sporting tournaments and federations.
For Ethiopia’s football fans in South Africa, the choice today was between OLF flag, the defacto Oromo flag, and the EPRDF (Ethiopia’s ruling party) flag. As you have said so eloquently, whether the Oromo and non-Oromo fans of Team Ethiopia displayed different flags didn’t matter. They both supported one team.
For far too long, at international sporting events and bazaars, a monolithic image of Ethiopia have been presented to the world. An Ethiopia with 3000 years of history that is still a christian island, has one flag, and speaks only Amharic.
But in reality, Ethiopia is a truly diverse nation with divergent aspirations and historical experiences. As a result, contending national sentiments (isms) have emerged. Under previous Ethiopian regimes, for example, the use of Afan Oromo in public spaces and government offices was banned.


Besides the beauty of the Ethiopian game and the composure the players showed after a long absence from the AFCON tournament, Ethiopian politics was at the centre of online discussion. Ethiopian fans in the stadium displayed various placards and flags representing different political interests.
Read: Waving Different Flags, Ethiopians Celebrate their Fight in AFCON 2013


Adding this to the themes of DO NOT JUDGE a fan or supporter based on what they look like. 
FOOTBALL IS BEAUTIFUL.
AND IT IS FOR ALL OF US. 
      reblogged from: footybedsheets

    footybedsheets:

    globalvoices:

    IMAGE: Ethiopian Muslims protest the Ethiopian Government while supporting the Ethiopian Team in South Africa at The Cup of African Nations 2013. From the Awolia School Support Page Facebook Page

    Ethiopians across the world are celebrating TeamEthiopia, their national Soccer team, who fought a hard draw against defending champions Zambia in the 2013 Africa Cup of Nations in Nelspruit, South Africa.

    Sport brings people together. The cheerful Oromo crowd in South Africa today is a good example of that. In the states, rarely do we see both sides (Oromo and other Ethiopians) cheering for the same team. We have separate sporting tournaments and federations.

    For Ethiopia’s football fans in South Africa, the choice today was between OLF flag, the defacto Oromo flag, and the EPRDF (Ethiopia’s ruling party) flag. As you have said so eloquently, whether the Oromo and non-Oromo fans of Team Ethiopia displayed different flags didn’t matter. They both supported one team.

    For far too long, at international sporting events and bazaars, a monolithic image of Ethiopia have been presented to the world. An Ethiopia with 3000 years of history that is still a christian island, has one flag, and speaks only Amharic.

    But in reality, Ethiopia is a truly diverse nation with divergent aspirations and historical experiences. As a result, contending national sentiments (isms) have emerged. Under previous Ethiopian regimes, for example, the use of Afan Oromo in public spaces and government offices was banned.

    Besides the beauty of the Ethiopian game and the composure the players showed after a long absence from the AFCON tournament, Ethiopian politics was at the centre of online discussion. Ethiopian fans in the stadium displayed various placards and flags representing different political interests.

    Read: Waving Different Flags, Ethiopians Celebrate their Fight in AFCON 2013

    Adding this to the themes of DO NOT JUDGE a fan or supporter based on what they look like. 

    FOOTBALL IS BEAUTIFUL.

    AND IT IS FOR ALL OF US. 

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  9. Tags

  10. afootballreport:

Take the time to take a step back: Best of Football Writing in 2012
With the clock winding down on 2012, the days for reminiscing are rising to fruition. Last year, I decided to create a list of what I thought were the best pieces of football writing in 2011. This year, I’m doing it again, and I’ve called upon some of the most influential voices in football to reflect on how we best interpreted, dissected, and brought meaning to the beautiful game.
Why? Because I think it’s important. So many care about this game. So many spend countless hours reading about it, never mind actually watching matches. Tremendous stories are told. Some of the genius we witness gets meticulously unraveled. But the reality is that in 2012, the world of online writing has never been in a position of such prominence. At the same time, however, the internet should not leave such a tower of writings to be forgotten.
Consider this project to be a sort of anthology. The games will be remembered in history, but make no mistake; our reactions and our stories can be forgotten.
My challenge for you this weekend: show me that you are willing to remember. Email me [contact at afootballreport dot com], tweet us, or even use the #BestFootballWriting hashtag to share the pieces of writing that resonated with you over the past twelve months. The list will be completed in fine fashion this weekend and presented shortly thereafter, but I am inviting you to get involved. Here’s your chance to contribute to something that will allow people to remember.
[Written by Eric Beard. Design: Dan Gribbon. Photo: Ryu Voelkel.]
      reblogged from: afootballreport

    afootballreport:

    Take the time to take a step back: Best of Football Writing in 2012

    With the clock winding down on 2012, the days for reminiscing are rising to fruition. Last year, I decided to create a list of what I thought were the best pieces of football writing in 2011. This year, I’m doing it again, and I’ve called upon some of the most influential voices in football to reflect on how we best interpreted, dissected, and brought meaning to the beautiful game.

    Why? Because I think it’s important. So many care about this game. So many spend countless hours reading about it, never mind actually watching matches. Tremendous stories are told. Some of the genius we witness gets meticulously unraveled. But the reality is that in 2012, the world of online writing has never been in a position of such prominence. At the same time, however, the internet should not leave such a tower of writings to be forgotten.

    Consider this project to be a sort of anthology. The games will be remembered in history, but make no mistake; our reactions and our stories can be forgotten.

    My challenge for you this weekend: show me that you are willing to remember. Email me [contact at afootballreport dot com], tweet us, or even use the #BestFootballWriting hashtag to share the pieces of writing that resonated with you over the past twelve months. The list will be completed in fine fashion this weekend and presented shortly thereafter, but I am inviting you to get involved. Here’s your chance to contribute to something that will allow people to remember.

    [Written by Eric Beard. Design: Dan Gribbon. Photo: Ryu Voelkel.]

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  11. thefootballarchivist:

February 1932: Chelsea players (from left to right: Barber, O’Dowd, Law, Cheyne and Pearson) enjoy a training session in the run-up to their FA Cup quarter-final tie with Liverpool. The Blues won that game 2-0 but lost to Newcastle in the last four.
      reblogged from: pitchinvasion

    thefootballarchivist:

    February 1932: Chelsea players (from left to right: Barber, O’Dowd, Law, Cheyne and Pearson) enjoy a training session in the run-up to their FA Cup quarter-final tie with Liverpool. The Blues won that game 2-0 but lost to Newcastle in the last four.

    (Source: )

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  12. tifofootball:

JEF United Ichihara Chiba
      reblogged from: tifofootball

    tifofootball:

    JEF United Ichihara Chiba

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  13.   reblogged from: inventfootball

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  14. nextgoalwinsmovie:

Jean leads the boys in a Hakka. Watch out Tonga! Ua ou sai nei ma le mea atoa!
      reblogged from: nextgoalwinsmovie

    nextgoalwinsmovie:

    Jean leads the boys in a Hakka. Watch out Tonga! Ua ou sai nei ma le mea atoa!

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  15. wongwong:

A match takes place against the backdrop of Gaza West-Bank houses.
via footballinframes
      reblogged from: wongwong

    wongwong:

    A match takes place against the backdrop of Gaza West-Bank houses.

    via footballinframes

    (Source: footballinframes)

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