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  2.   reblogged from: pandasgifs
  3. Rarely do the original communities benefit from an acceptance of “ethnic” styles in the mainstream. White America has always wanted our look, not us. When South Asian bangles, embroidered flats, and paisley print became accepted in the mainstream, it wasn’t South Asians who suddenly became cool. When a Pakistani woman wears a headscarf or an Indian woman wears a bindi, she is subject to everything from scorn to violence; they risk being seen as “unassimilated.” Since the launch of the “war on terror,” Muslim women wearing the hijab have been subject to public beatings, harassment, and workplace discrimination. Our cultural artifacts become identity markers and those markers become targets. I love the hijab, but the last time I wore it a man in a pickup truck followed me screaming slurs. Meanwhile Rihanna poses in one, Madonna models under a niqab, Lady Gaga sings about burqas. Appropriation occurs when bodies, typically white, popularize styles that didn’t originate with them, across a matrix of power: the power of visibility, the power to define what is “ethnic” in the market. The gains that follow are reserved for the appropriator, not the appropriated. When the participation of poc in mainstream culture is relegated to trinkets Urban Outfitters can sell, what are we supposed to do, be grateful? While our communities are mined for the latest hip accessories that are lauded on white bodies while suspect on ours, it’s a valuation of whiteness above us. Above our history, dignity, and humanity. I want to see dreadlocks be appreciated because of the black people wearing them, not the corny white dude who doesn’t have to worry about looking “too ethnic” at a job interview. I want to see Bollywood dances appreciated from our current Indian American Miss America, not Selena Gomez’s mangled approximation in her VMA performance of “Come and Get It.” Guess which one of them was subsequently called a terrorist.
    — I and twelve others spoke to BULLET about appropriation in fashion (via pushinghoopswithsticks)
      reblogged from: footybedsheets

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  4. thejapanesewoodblock:




Monkey Songoku


























Kinoshita Roshū (Japan, 1807-1879)

Japan, 19th century
Prints; woodcuts
Color woodblock print; surimono
      reblogged from: drawpaintprint

    thejapanesewoodblock:

    Monkey Songoku

    Japan, 19th century

    Prints; woodcuts
    Color woodblock print; surimono

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  5. explore-blog:

Susan Sontag on literature and freedom – superb read.
      reblogged from: explore-blog

    explore-blog:

    Susan Sontag on literature and freedom – superb read.

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  6. nevver:

Chiroptera
      reblogged from: nevver

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  8. theanimalblog:

Game park ranger Chad Cocking took this photograph of a young leopard resting its paw on an impala it had just caught in Kruger National Park, SA. Unfortunately the friendship was not to last and the leopard eventually got bored with its own game and ate the impala.  Picture: Chad Cocking/Barcroft Media
      reblogged from: theanimalblog

    theanimalblog:

    Game park ranger Chad Cocking took this photograph of a young leopard resting its paw on an impala it had just caught in Kruger National Park, SA. Unfortunately the friendship was not to last and the leopard eventually got bored with its own game and ate the impala.  Picture: Chad Cocking/Barcroft Media

  9. nevver:

“I believe in luck: how else can you explain the success of those you don’t like?” ― Jean Cocteau
      reblogged from: nevver

    nevver:

    “I believe in luck: how else can you explain the success of those you don’t like?” ― Jean Cocteau

  10.   reblogged from: thischarmingcharlie

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  11. yay, updated my footie calendar.

  12. fraja8:

photo by Carlos Eduardo Fragoso Fernandes
      reblogged from: fraja8
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  14.   reblogged from: beneaththepool

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